1996

Abstract

A growing literature suggests that high-income countries export high-quality goods. Two hypotheses may explain such specialization, with different implications for welfare, inequality, and trade policy. Fajgelbaum, Grossman, and Helpman (JPE -2011-) formalize the Linder (1961) conjecture that home demand determines the pattern of specialization and therefore predict that high-income locations export high-quality products. The factor-proportions model also predicts that skill-abundant, high-income locations export skill-intensive, high-quality products (Schott, QJE 2004). Prior empirical evidence does not separate these explanations. I develop a model that nests both hypotheses and employ microdata on US manufacturing plants’ shipments and factor inputs to quantify the two mechanisms’ roles in quality specialization across US cities. Home-market demand explains at least as much of the relationship between income and quality as differences in factor usage.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/papers/25189808/168
2014-09-16
2022-01-25
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/papers/25189808/168
Loading
  • Published online: 16 Sep 2014
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error
aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cud3RvLWlsaWJyYXJ5Lm9yZy8K